If you are planning to sell your home, a Seller's Home Inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition and derive a higher price.

To a buyer, the home inspection is viewed as a realistic assessment of a property's condition, and evaluation of safety issues and home deficiencies.

Although a home inspection's primary function is an unbiased evaluation of the property, in some cases the home inspection can serve as the catalyst for a re-negotiated purchase and sale agreement. Such re-negotiations may result in repairs assumed by the owner, a reduced selling price, or - where serious defects are discovered - revocation of the offer by the purchaser.

Today, more than ever, home buyers are having home inspections performed before purchasing a property. Buyers frequently seek a licensed, third-party professional assessment to confirm that their choice is sound or shed light on what future repairs may be needed. While inspectors do not make recommendations on whether a buyer should or shouldn't purchase the house they inspect, their home inspection findings can carry considerable weight and influence.

Historically, inspections have been performed at the request of the home buyer.

But consider the position of the seller. Without question the homeowner also has a valued interest riding on the transaction.

A sale that falls through can be disastrous for the seller. They may have purchased a new home, contingent upon the sale of the existing property. Without funds from the present sale, the new purchase would likely not go through. No one wins when a transaction doesn't go forward.

While an inspection prepared for a seller will not be a substitute for a buyer's inspection, it nevertheless serves a useful purpose: it will alert the seller to potential conditions that could alter or delay a sale.

People who live in a house get accustomed to the property and may not see conditions as shortfalls that a potential buyer might. For example, a 22-year-old furnace may still be working wonderfully. But statistically, it will need to be replaced within five years. That's an outlay of $1,000-$2,500 that the buyer might not anticipate.

A professional, ASHI Certified home inspector is trained to notice what most people are not trained to see. An inspector serves as a detective, looking for existing or potential problems. With no vested interest in the sale of the property, the objective diagnostic report of the home inspector will enable the seller to determine what needs repaired prior to placing the property on the market, and allow them to solve problems before putting their home on the market with issues that may effect the sale.

A Seller's Home Inspection is like insurance. By being aware of potential problems and repairing them prior to putting your home on the market, your sale will go much more smoothly without the danger of being bitten by a hidden surprise.

Contact us today to schedule your Seller's Home Inspection, and let's remove any guesswork from the planned sale of your home.

Jones Brothers Home Inspections serves the Tri-Cites area and most of Benton and Franklin counties. If you live in Kennewick, Pasco, Richland, West Richland, Benton City, or anywhere in the surrounding area, call us for your Home Inspection needs!